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Small club. Big aspirations..

We meet Thursdays at 6:15 PM
Elks Lodge
37 4th Street
Old Town, ME  04468
United States
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Our 66th annual Hunters Breakfast will be held Saturday from 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. in Old Town's Waterfront Park.
We'll be setting up in the parking area next to the Comfort Station on Friday afternoon.  Frank's General Rental crew will start setting up the tent around noon; Rotary volunteers will set up the grills after the tents are up, and we'll set up tables, wrap napkins and eating utensils, and to other get-ready chores later in the afternoon.   
This is our premier event each year.  A sign-up list has been passed around listing many of the tasks that need to be done, and hopefully many of you have signed up.  If you haven't, don't worry.  Just show up Saturday morning (and Friday afternoon), and there will be something for you to do.  We start serving promptly at 4 a.m., so we'll need people to help set up starting about 3 a.m.  
If getting up that early isn't your thing, we'll also need people to help with clean-up,  Some people prefer to arrive about 6 or 7 a.m. and stay until 9 or 10 (if it takes that long) to get everything cleaned up.

September and October are the two busiest months of the year for Old Town Rotarians.  If you are able to volunteer, we need your help.
We have a number of activities coming up that will require an effort by all of us in order to accomplish our club service and fund-raising objectives.
During the current week (Sept. 19-23), Doug Marchio will be constructing the club's Riverfest Float, which we will also use for the holiday parade in downtown Bangor.  He will be working in Bugsy's barn and can use as much help as you can give him.  Our Thursday night meeting will be a pizza and work party at the barn.
On Friday and Saturday, September 23-24, Old Town will celebrate Riverfest.  
On Friday night, we'll be serving free ice cream at the Waterfront Park, starting about 7 and continuing until we run out.  We'll need volunteers to do this--please bring your own ice cream scoop.  Friday evening, Linda will need volunteers at her house to help parboil the chicken and otherwise prepare for Saturday's chicken BBQ.  On Saturday, Linda and Bugsy will need help cooking and serving the chicken.  Serving time is approximately 11 to mid-afternoon (or whenever the chicken runs out); but if you wait until then, you may have trouble accessing the park because of the parade.
On Saturday, October 1, we'll need volunteers to help out at the Juniper Ridge Landfill Open House, which is being organized by Old Town Rotarian Wayne Boyd, who manages the landfill for Casella.  8-10 volunteers will be needed to take tickets, help pre-cook french fries for the Fryolater, and perform other duties as assigned.
Then, for the month of October, we'll be hard at work preparing for our 66th annual Hunters Breakfast and selling ads for our Hunters Breakfast newspaper, which will be mailed to 11,000 homes in mid-October.
We'll also be participating with the two Bangor clubs on our "Purple Pinkie" project, to raise funds for and awareness of Rotary International's Polio Plus project, which seeks to eradicate polio from our planet.


The District Governor visits the Rotary Club of Old Town

John F. Germ

John F. Germ

President 2016-17

August 2016

Forty years ago, a man named George Campbell, the owner of the company I worked for, invited me to join Rotary. Back then, that was a common practice in the United States. Your boss invited you to join Rotary because he thought it would be good for business and good for the community, and you said yes. It’s not surprising that our membership surged during that period.

George warned me not to use Rotary as an excuse to slack off at work. Even so, I always had time to attend lunch meetings and serve on committees. I never had to worry that taking a long lunch once a week would hurt my advancement, or what my boss would think about the occasional Rotary phone call at work.

Today, things are different. Companies are less generous about time, and not every manager looks favorably on community service. It’s hard to enjoy a Rotary meeting when you’ve got emails piling up on your phone. It’s harder than ever to balance work with Rotary – and the model that gave us so much growth a few decades ago is part of what’s holding back our growth now.

That’s why the recent Council on Legislation adopted some innovative measures that allow clubs to vary their meeting times and expand their pool of prospective members. Clubs have more flexibility now to respond to the needs of their members and to clear away as many barriers to membership as they can. But there’s one barrier to membership that only you can remove, one thing that every prospective member needs to become a Rotarian: an invitation to join a Rotary club.

Whenever I tell a group of Rotarians that we need more willing hands, more caring hearts, and more bright minds to move our work forward, everyone applauds. But those hands, hearts, and minds won’t magically appear in our clubs. We have to ask them to join. And an invitation to Rotary is something that only you can give. An invitation is a gift. It’s saying to someone, “I think you have the skills, the talent, and the character to make our community better, and I want you to join me in doing that.”

I’m the president of Rotary International, but the only club I can invite someone to join is the Rotary Club of Chattanooga, Tenn. I can’t make your club or your community stronger. Only you can do that – by inviting the qualified people you know to join you in Rotary Serving Humanity.


The annual tradition of every Rotary Club in the world: the installation of new officers. 
 A fantastic time was had by all!
Another District Conference has come and gone.  We had wonderful weather, fabulous fellowship and took home our share of knowledge, ideas, inspiration and awards.
Stan and Rachel did an incredible job presenting their NID trip to India to the whole assembly.  In addition to their talk, we heard from many other clubs and learned about some extremely interesting projects that are happening around our district.

Posted on

140120_alpayBy Şafak Alpay, RI director-elect and a member of the Rotary Club of Istanbul-Sisli, Turkey

About ten years ago, an ambitious literacy campaign was started in our region using the Concentrated Language Encounter (CLE) method. Like all other clubs, my club Sisli participated with great enthusiasm, running a course for women in one of Istanbul’s slum neighborhoods.


This year's Charity Auction was another fun time and a great success. 

Every week since about February, you start hearing your president harping about District Conference.  So what is it all about, anyway?

We've added another fine new member!   David is the owner of Mahan Redemption Center in Old Town.  Our snowbirds are just returning home so if you haven't had the opportunity to meet him yet, make sure to say hello at the next meeting.

Well the season is over and the scores are in.  Congratulations to our winners of the Polio Plus Superbowl game!!!



First Quarter: Ralph

Second Quarter: Stan

Third Quarter: Bruce

Game Final: Sandy

And the BIG Winner:  POLIO PLUS!!! 

Thank you to everyone who played the special Superbowl edition of our game.  We raised another $125 for Polio Plus and that makes us all winners.

January is Vocational Service Month.  We have all heard the term a lot in Rotary but do we really know what it means to provide Vocational Service? 
On a beautiful sunny day in southern California the streets of Pasadena were lined with more than 700,000 excited people awaiting the New Year’s Day extravaganza.  Through the wonders of our technological age, they were joined by about 53 million others in the United States alone, and another 28 million around the world.  It was the 127th Tournament of Roses Parade!  And yep….I was one of the 53 million.  I am not one to sit and watch parades in general but I had an ulterior motive …I wanted to see my float.  WHAT?  I had a float in the parade??? 
Once again our fellow Rotarians in Bangor hosted a magnificent Parade of Lights....a spectacular community event beloved by kids of all ages.  We were proud to be able to join in the fun with our End Polio float and it was a crowd pleaser.
President Sandy reports:  "We did not win but we had a great float, the biggest we have done so far, and you should have heard the crowd cheer whenever our "Gifts" to the World popped up and danced!  It was great!!  Everyone had a great time and we are looking forward to coming up with a theme for next year's float!"
The winning floats are listed below:
  • Outstanding Non-Profit Entry is Bangor Rotary
  • Outstanding Youth Entry is Boy Scouts Pack 6 Bangor
  • Outstanding Commercial Entry is Lane Construction
  • Outstanding Performing Entry is Morita's School of Dance
  • Outstanding Adult Entry is Citizens of Maine, LLC
  • Outstanding Band Entry is Pride of Madawaska Marching Band
Congratulations to this year's winning floats...but face it we all win when we make the people in our community happy!  Thanks to all of you who worked so hard to bring our End Polio float to life.  Santa is sure to fill your stockings to the brim!  Thanks to Robin for taking some photos of our float.  You can see them in the photo album on the left. 

This past week we were fortunate to have two special guests join our meeting.   
Ann Cote came as a visiting Rotarian from Rhode Island and brought her sister Cheryl.  Ann is here in Maine staying with her sister Cheryl who is staying at Sarah's House during treatments!  What a wonderful thing to meet someone getting the help they need in a warm and inviting place all because of a Rotarian who had a dream.

This past week we had a great program with an update from Bill Miller and Mike Noyes from one of OTR's long standing favorite organizations to support....Camp CaPella! 
 Camp CaPella is a lakefront summer camp at Phillips Lake that provides diverse recreational and educational opportunities for children and adults with disabilities. It is for all campers regardless of ability, to be afforded an opportunity to enjoy a summer program with learning experiences, recreational activities, and fun. It is also a retreat offered to administration, staff, and clients of other agencies and programs in the community that serve the needs of children and adults with disabilities. Camp CaPella offers year round recreational and educational opportunities.
The camp had an amazing year with 179 campers and they have expansion plans that will accommodate 10 additional campers a week in the future! Check out their website at campcapella.org to see the unique experiences this camp provides for these kids!...Better yet, as Bill and Mike will both tell you, come on over and experience it for yourself!

Remember that great program we had a few months ago by Sharon Klein from UMaine about window inserts to reduce heat loss for the winter?  Well as most of you know, our very own Stan is one of her students and this past weekend he and several members of the Old Town Rotary Family had "the build."  They constructed window inserts that will be delivered to the specific homes for which they were meticulously measured and made.  They will be installed just in time for the frosty weather of Maine winter.  Since it is a college course aimed at economic development of sustainable conservation, the project will continue later next year as research is conducted to ascertain what effect the inserts had on the heat usage and loss of those lucky enough to have them.  Congrats to Stan and his Old Town friends on a successful build.  Check out a few photos of the build in the photo album to the left. 

To see more photos of the Purple Pinky Project click on the Photo Albums in the left column. 


Imagine making gasoline from a tree.  How cool would that be? 
Being a gift to the world never felt so good!

In golf you are essentially your own opponent.  You cannot influence how well others play, or exert control over the course or the weather conditions.  You are a team of one and the only control you have is over your own performance.  BUT.....
A Paul Harris Fellow is The Rotary Foundation’s way of expressing its appreciation to an individual for a contribution of $1,000, made either by them or by someone else in their name, in support of TRF’s educational and humanitarian programs.  The recognition is named for our founder, Paul Harris.  A contribution to The Rotary Foundation is an investment in the ideal of goodwill, peace and understanding: an ideal held in high regard by Rotarians the world over.
PHF was established in 1957 to show appreciation for and encourage substantial contributions to what was then the Foundation’s only program, Rotary Foundation Fellowships for Advanced Study, the precursor to Ambassadorial Scholarships.  The first Paul Harris Fellows include 1937-38 RI Director Allison G. Brush and longtime RI Treasurer Rufus F. Chapin, both for donations made in 1946. 
Though established as a fund raising tool, Rotarians often designate a Paul Harris Fellow as a tribute to honor a person whose life demonstrates a shared purpose with the objectives of The Rotary Foundation or who has performed an exemplary service to Rotary.
The first PHF awarded to an individual includes a certificate, a lapel pin and an optional ribboned medallion to be worn around the neck.  Subsequent PHFs to the same person are awarded by a new lapel pin with a given number of sapphires around the perimeter indicating the additional awards up to five.  Thus for example, a PHF pin with three sapphires would be a "Plus 3": a total of four awards.  A PHF pin with five sapphires would be a "Plus 5" for a total of six.  After the fifth sapphire the new pin will contain 1 to 3 rubies indicating the 7th, 8th, and finally, the maximum 9th award. 
This week PP Corina was proud to place a new lapel pin on PP Robin in recognition of her fervent dedication and support of our club over the past year...and always.  Congratulations to Robin on her second PHF....it is well deserved!

Oct 27, 2016
Sen. Jim Dill, Hunter's Breakfast planning
Jim is the Democratic candidate running for re-election to State Senate - District 5
Nov 03, 2016
Ben Smith
The Rotary Foundation
Nov 17, 2016
Larry Wade
Meeting Responsibilities
10/06/16 Meeting Duties
Door Duty
Smith, Ben
Door Duty
Adams, Mischelle
Door Prize
Morin, Sandy
10/13/16 Meeting Duties
Door Duty
Marchio, Douglas
Door Duty
Johnston, Steve
Door Prize
Howes, Josh
10/20/16 Meeting Duties
Door Duty
Veeder, Chuck
Door Duty
Johnston, Betts
Door Prize
Merchant, Robin
10/27/2016 Meeting Duties
Door Duty
King, Gwendolyn
Door Duty
Gallant, Lisa
Door Prize
Veeder, Jane

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